Mystery Wonders
Bermuda Triangle

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The Bermuda Triangle is the expanse of water between Florida, San Juan and Bermuda, whose connecting co-ordinates forms the infamous zone of mystery. There have been reports of innumerable planes and boats going missing in this region, all under mysterious circumstances. This zone is known to be one of the world's most heavily traversed shipping lanes, with vessels commuting daily to ports in the Americas, Europe and the Caribbean Islands. Various reasons have been volunteered for the disappearances, including bad weather, alien abductions, time warps and even talk of the suspension of the laws of physics. The first unexplained event occurred in the 1950s when the story of Flight 19 - a group of five US Navy bombers on a training mission - was made public. "We are entering white water, nothing seems right. We don't know where we are, the water is green, no white," the flight leader reportedly said via radio. It was also claimed that Navy officials said the planes "flew off to Mars". Sceptics believe that such incidents have been greatly exaggerated and that ships have sunk at many places around the world; the Bermuda Triangle is no exception. There are, of course, a host of other theories, including those that suggest the Earth's magnetic field played its part in confusing instruments - apparently a magnetic compass loses all its bearing in this zone. The other most commonly cited reason is the tidal waves - influenced by the magnetic disturbances previously alluded to. It is worth noting that whatever reason is most in vogue at any given time, there is still no hard evidence as to what happened to the many missing planes and boats.


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The Bermuda Triangle is a mythical section of the Atlantic Ocean roughly bounded by Miami, Bermuda and Puerto Rico where dozens of ships and airplanes have disappeared. Unexplained circumstances surround some of these accidents, including one in which the pilots of a squadron of U.S. Navy bombers became disoriented while flying over the area; the planes were never found. Other boats and planes have seemingly vanished from the area in good weather without even radioing distress messages. But although myriad fanciful theories have been proposed regarding the Bermuda Triangle, none of them prove that mysterious disappearances occur more frequently there than in other well-traveled sections of the ocean. In fact, people navigate the area every day without incident. The area referred to as the Bermuda Triangle, or Devil’s Triangle, covers about 500,000 square miles of ocean off the southeastern tip of Florida. When Christopher Columbus sailed through the area on his first voyage to the New World, he reported that a great flame of fire (probably a meteor) crashed into the sea one night and that a strange light appeared in the distance a few weeks later. He also wrote about erratic compass readings, perhaps because at that time a sliver of the Bermuda Triangle was one of the few places on Earth where true north and magnetic north lined up. After gaining widespread fame as the first person to sail solo around the globe, Joshua Slocum disappeared on a 1909 voyage from Martha’s Vineyard to South America. Though it’s unclear exactly what happened, many sources later attributed his death to the Bermuda Triangle. William Shakespeare’s play “The Tempest,” which some scholars claim was based on a real-life Bermuda shipwreck, may have enhanced the area’s aura of mystery. Nonetheless, reports of unexplained disappearances did not really capture the public’s attention until the 20th century. An especially infamous tragedy occurred in March 1918 when the USS Cyclops, a 542-foot-long Navy cargo ship with over 300 men and 10,000 tons of manganese ore onboard, sank somewhere between Barbados and the Chesapeake Bay. The Cyclops never sent out an SOS distress call despite being equipped to do so, and an extensive search found no wreckage. “Only God and the sea know what happened to the great ship,” U.S. President Woodrow Wilson later said. In 1941 two of the Cyclops’ sister ships similarly vanished without a trace along nearly the same route. A pattern allegedly began forming in which vessels traversing the Bermuda Triangle would either disappear or be found abandoned. Then, in December 1945, five Navy bombers carrying 14 men took off from a Fort Lauderdale, Florida, airfield in order to conduct practice bombing runs over some nearby shoals. But with his compasses apparently malfunctioning, the leader of the mission, known as Flight 19, got severely lost. All five planes flew aimlessly until they ran low on fuel and were forced to ditch at sea. That same day, a rescue plane and its 13-man crew also disappeared. After a massive weeks-long search failed to turn up any evidence, the official Navy report declared that it was “as if they had flown to Mars.” By the time author Vincent Gaddis coined the phrase “Bermuda Triangle” in a 1964 magazine article, additional mysterious accidents had occurred in the area, including three passenger planes that went down despite having just sent “all’s well” messages. Charles Berlitz, whose grandfather founded the Berlitz language schools, stoked the legend even further in 1974 with a sensational bestseller about the legend. Since then, scores of fellow paranormal writers have blamed the triangle’s supposed lethalness on everything from aliens, Atlantis and sea monsters to time warps and reverse gravity fields, whereas more scientifically minded theorists have pointed to magnetic anomalies, waterspouts or huge eruptions of methane gas from the ocean floor. In all probability, however, there is no single theory that solves the mystery. As one skeptic put it, trying to find a common cause for every Bermuda Triangle disappearance is no more logical than trying to find a common cause for every automobile accident in Arizona. Moreover, although storms, reefs and the Gulf Stream can cause navigational challenges there, maritime insurance leader Lloyd’s of London does not recognize the Bermuda Triangle as an especially hazardous place. Neither does the U.S. Coast Guard, which says: “In a review of many aircraft and vessel losses in the area over the years, there has been nothing discovered that would indicate that casualties were the result of anything other than physical causes. No extraordinary factors have ever been identified.”




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Sahara Desert
Rio de Janeiro
Lighthouse of Alexandria
Katmai Crater Lake
K2 Pakistan
Pillars of weathering
Machu Picchu
Mount Nemrut
Underwater Cancun
200 yo mummy not dead
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Aurora
Waterfalls Rio Tulija
Blue Belize Hole
Hitler fled to Argentina
Area 51
Vimana Flying Machine
Black Hole
Nasca Lines
Underwater Museum Cancún Mexico
Blue Neon Waves
Mount Rushmore
Sailing Stones
Pamukkale
Ark of the Covenant
Bermuda Triangle
The Ancient City of Mes Aynak
El Chupacabra
Colosseum Rome Italy
Pompeii After Eruption
Acropolis of Athens
Borobudur Temple
Giant Stone Balls
Valley of Love Ireland
Santorini
Valley of the Kings
Bagan Myanmar
Red Rain
Kukulkan Pyramid Chichen Itza
Matterhorn Mountain
Ancient Atomic Bomb India
Angel Falls
Mausoleum at Halicarnassus
Crystal Underwater Pyramid Cuba
Taj Mahal
The Wonder Cave
Banaue Rice Terraces
Kittiwake Shipwreck
Largest Crab Ever
Stonehenge
Two Headed Snake
Twin Town
Angkor Wat
Spontaneous combustion
Iron Pillar Delhi
Sigiriya Sri Lanka
Stone Forest
Victoria Falls
GREAT SPHINX OF GIZA
Underwater Pyramids of Cuba
Lost Heracleion City
3,800 year old mummy Xiahoe
Shroud of Turin
Paracas Skulls
Timbuktu
Terracotta Army
Reed Flute Cave
Fly Geyser
Memnon Colossi
Hanging Gardens of Babylon
Colossus of Rhodes
Antarctica
Arizona Wave
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Great Pyramid of Giza
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Parícutin
Lost Kingdom Of Cleopatra
Plitvice Lakes
Leshan Giant Buddha China
Statue of Zeus at Olympia
Door to Hell
Wonder Rock










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